North Carolina State University

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NC State was founded in 1887 with a purpose: to create economic, societal and intellectual prosperity. Today we are a preeminent research enterprise that excels in science, technology, engineering, math, design, the humanities and social sciences, textiles and veterinary medicine. Our 1,600-acre campus is located in Raleigh, the state capital of North Carolina. NC State students, faculty and staff take problems in hand and work with industry, government and nonprofit partners to solve them. Our 34,000-plus high-performing students apply what they learn in the real world by conducting research, working in internships and co-ops, and performing acts of world-changing service. That experiential education ensures they leave here ready to lead the workforce, confident in the knowledge that NC State consistently rates as one of the best values in higher education. Our 9,000 faculty and staff are world leaders in their fields, bridging the divides between academic disciplines and training high-caliber students to meet tomorrow’s challenges. Together, they forge powerful partnerships with government, industry, nonprofits and academia to remake our world for the better.

 

The North Carolina General Assembly founded NC State on March 7, 1887 as a land-grant college under the name "North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts." In the segregated system, it was open only to white students. As a land-grant college, NC State would provide a liberal and practical education while focusing on military tactics, agriculture and the mechanical arts without excluding classical studies. Since its founding, the university has maintained these objectives while building on them. After opening in 1889, NC State saw its enrollment fluctuate and its mandate expand. In 1918, it changed its name to "North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering"—or "North Carolina State" for short. During the Great Depression, the North Carolina state government, under GovernorO. Max Gardner, administratively combined the University of North Carolina, the Woman's College (at Greensboro), and NC State. This conglomeration became the University of North Carolina in 1931. Following World War II, the university grew and developed. The G.I. Bill enabled thousands of veterans to attend college, and enrollment shot past the 5,000 mark in 1947.

State College created new academic programs, including the School of Architecture and Landscape Design in 1947 (renamed as the School of Design in 1948), the School of Education in 1948, and the School of Forestry in 1950. In the summer of 1956, following the US Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education (1954) that segregated public education was unconstitutional, North Carolina State College enrolled its first African-American undergraduates, Ed Carson, Manuel Crockett, Irwin Holmes, and Walter Holmes.

In 1962, State College officials desired to change the institution's name to North Carolina State University. Consolidated university administrators approved a change to the University of North Carolina at Raleigh, frustrating many student and alumni who protested the change with letter writing campaigns. In 1963, State College officially became North Carolina State of the University of North Carolina. Students, faculty, and alumni continued to express dissatisfaction with this name, however, and after two additional years of protest, the name was changed to the current North Carolina State University at Raleigh. The "at Raleigh" part is usually omitted even on official documents such as diplomas, but is part of the school's official name.

In 1966, single-year enrollment reached 10,000. In the 1970s enrollment surpassed 19,000 and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences was added.

Celebrating its centennial in 1987, NC State reorganized its internal structure, renaming all its schools to colleges (e.g. School of Engineering to the College of Engineering). Also in this year, it gained 700 acres (2.8 km2) of land that was developed as Centennial Campus. Since then, NC State has focused on developing its new Centennial Campus. It has invested more than $620 million in facilities and infrastructure at the new campus, with 62 acres (0.3 km2) of space being constructed. sixty-one private and government agency partners are located on Centennial Campus.[14]

NC State has almost 8,000 employees, nearly 35,000 students, a $1.01 billion annual budget, and a $984 million endowment. It is the largest university in the state and one of the anchors of North Carolina's Research Triangle, together with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center, located in D.H. Hill Library, maintains a website devoted to NC State history entitled Historical State.


USA requirements for international students

Each university in the Unites States of America sets its own admission standards so there isn't the same criteria for all the students and the university can decide which applicants meet those standards. The fee for each application is between $35 to $100. 

After the selections of the universities you want to attend, the best of all would be to contact each university for an application form and more admission information for the international students. Moreover, for a graduate or postgraduate program it's necessary to verify the admission requirements. Some programs require that you send your application directly to their department. 

Admissions decisions are based on students's academic record and different test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT (for undergraduate programs) and GRE or GMAT (for graduate programs). Admission decision is based on your academic results and motivation.


Admission requirements

Considered a more selective university, NC State accepts about half of those who apply for undergraduate admission. For the class of 2019, 21,104 applied and 10,584, or 50%, were accepted, of whom 4,210 enrolled.

Members of the class of 2019 had average SAT verbal, math and writing scores of 610, 640 and 587, respectively, for a two-part total (verbal and math) of 1250 (1600-point scale) or a three-part total of 1836 (2400-point scale). The 4,210 students who enrolled had an average high school GPA of 4.44; 40%, or 1,677, ranked in the top 10% of their graduating classes. There were 130 valedictorians and 102 salutatorians in the class.

Transfer admission is also very competitive. The mean transfer GPA was a 3.30 fall of 2008. In the fall of 2015, 4,165 students applied to the transfer class; 1,470, or 35%, were admitted.

NC State does not require undergraduate admission candidates to choose a preferred college of study. After determining that an applicant meets the overall university requirements, the individual college must also agree to accept the student. Because of this process, some colleges have significantly higher admission requirements than others.

The Graduate School reviews all postgraduate education applications. For fall 2015, 14,394 prospective students applied to the Graduate School; 3,460 (24%) were admitted. Of these, 2,982 (80.3%) enrolled.

For 2017, U.S. News & World Report ranks NC State tied for 92nd out of all national universities and tied for 38th out of public universities in the U.S., and 62nd for "best value" schools. The Academic Ranking of World Universities positions NC State in the 201-300 range among 500 world universities in 2016 and 32nd best university worldwide for Engineering in 2015.

Kiplinger's Personal Finance placed NC State 11th in its 2016 ranking of best value public colleges in the United States.

For 2017, U.S. News & World Report ranks NC State's Nuclear Engineering program 6th in the nation and its Biological & Agricultural Engineering program tied for 10th. Additionally, U.S. News & World Report ranked NC State's Veterinary program tied for 3rd nationally. For 2010 the Wall Street Journal surveyed recruiters and ranked NC State number 19 among the top 25 recruiter picks.

Many residence halls host events, though alcohol policies are strictly enforced.

Witherspoon Student Center (A.K.A. Student Center Annex) houses an African American Cultural Center which has an art gallery and a library. The cultural center moved to its current location in Witherspoon in 1991, having formerly been located in the Print Shop. Witherspoon also houses Student Media and a multicultural student affairs office.

Student life at North Carolina State University includes opportunities in a diverse range of activities and organizations. These include multicultural groups, arts groups, political and social action groups, service and professional groups, religious groups, Greek organizations, sports and recreation groups, academic and professional groups, and special interest groups such as the Clogging Team, the Film Society, the Judo Club, the Equestrian Club, and the Black Finesse Modeling Troupe.

Residence life

Thirty-five percent of full-time undergraduate students live on campus in one of nineteen residence halls. Most residence halls provide events that acclimate incoming students to the college experience. Many residence halls house villages, such as Honors Village in the Quad, Global Village in Alexander Hall, Scholars Village in Sullivan Hall, Impact Leadership Village in Bowen Hall, WISE in Lee Hall, Arts Village in Turlington Hall First Year Commons in Owen and Tucker Hall, and Black Male Initiative in Avent Ferry. The residence hall or residence hall area has an elected council to provide for local event programming and an outlet for student concerns. Collectively, representatives from each hall make up the Inter-Residence Council which represents the on-campus residence-life community as a whole.

University housing facilities are divided into four areas: East Campus, Central Campus, West Campus, and University Apartments.

Athletics

North Carolina State (NC State) teams are known as the Wolfpack. They compete as a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level (Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) sub-level for football), primarily competing in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) for all sports since the 1953–54 season. Men's sports include baseball, basketball, cheerleading, cross country, football, golf, soccer, swimming & diving, tennis, track & field and wrestling; while women's sports include basketball, cheerleading, cross country, golf, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, track & field and volleyball.

NC State has won eight national championships: two NCAA championships, two AIAW championships, and four titles under other sanctioning bodies. Most NC State fans and athletes recognize the rivalry with the North Carolina Tar Heels as their biggest. NC State was a founding member of the Southern Conference and of the Atlantic Coast Conference, and it is one of the four teams on "Tobacco Road".

NC State athletic teams are nicknamed the 'Wolfpack' (most women's teams are also called the "Wolfpack," except for the women's basketball team who go by the "Wolfpack Women"). The name was adopted in 1922 when a disgruntled fan described the behavior of the student body at athletic events as being "like a wolf pack." Prior to the adoption of the current nickname, NC State athletic teams went by such names as the Aggies, the Techs, and the Red Terrors. Since the 1960s the Wolfpack has been represented at athletic events by its mascots, Mr. and Mrs. Wuf. In print, the 'Strutting Wolf' is used and is known by the name 'Tuffy.'

The NC State wrestling team was established in 1925, and is coached by Pat Popolizio, named head wrestling coach for the Wolfpack on April 10, 2012. The team has won 14 ACC Championships & 5 individual NCAA Champions.

Athletic facilities

The stadium property is 3.4 mi (5.5 km) northwest of the Memorial Bell Tower. Both Carter–Finley Stadium and the PNC Arena are located there. Aside from the two stadiums, the property is mainly open space used for event parking. The property borders the North Carolina State Fair to the North and hosts tailgating parties before NC State football games.[83][84] Located on campus, Reynolds Coliseum is now home to all services of ROTC and several Wolfpack teams, including women's basketball, women's volleyball, women's gymnastics, and men's wrestling.

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