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  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: $ 11.3k
  • Foreign: $ 20.7k
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English

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    About

    The BA Sociology, BA Criminology programmes are delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, research-based workshops, individual supervision of research based assignment and guided individual work through learning technologies such as DUO.

    Lectures provide key information on the key conceptual tools, methodologies, research and scholarship in the subject area. They also expose students to the skills of research synthesis and note taking.

    Seminars are intended as guided, small group discussions of the subject area. They rely on independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours to be effective. They provide key learning scaffolding opportunities for students’ development of skills of conceptualisation and contextualisation, which are key for these programmes. Students also develop public speaking skills and research synthesis abilities.

    Research based workshops allow the students to gain hands-on experience of research in the subject area and to develop practical skills in the method of social research in the context of small group discussion and team working. They are also useful for developing team working skill and information gathering and analysis skills.

    In this final year of the programme, the dissertation module provides an opportunity to put into practice research skills developed in earlier years. While this project is a largely independent piece of study, students receive four hours of one-to-one supervision with an academic member of staff in addition to workshops and group sessions designed to address common themes and allow students to share ideas and experiences of undertaking independent research.

    The balance of these learning contexts changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and understanding of the subject area, and increase their confidence and abilities as independent, autonomous and critical learners. This is crucial not only for their integration in the community of social scientists but also for success in diverse professional and working environments, or further study.

    In the first year students will establish a fundamental knowledge and understanding of key concepts and issues relating to core disciplines within the sociology or criminology. At level one, students are expected to attend an average of 6 hours of lectures per week, and around 6 hrs of small group-based teaching fortnightly in terms 1 and 2 (e.g. seminars, practical workshops). Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

    The balance starts to shift in the second year, as students further develop their abilities as ‘independent learners’. Students are exposed to more advanced conceptual, theoretical models and to key methodological knowledge of the subject area, and develop their skills to critically assess theories and methods in relation to substantive areas of knowledge. Lectures still play an important role in supporting students in developing their knowledge and skills, with an average of 6 hours a week, while the frequency of seminars remains the same; students participate in eight one hour seminars or research-based workshops per 20 credit module across the academic year. This amounts to an average of 3-4 hrs of small group contact hours per week for a level two student.

    This move towards developing conceptualisation and contextualisation skills and to evaluate more complex issues in relation to selected disciplines is finalised in the third year. Lectures and small group teaching retain the same typical format of weekly lecture and fortnightly seminar but students are invited to engage with academic issues at the forefront of sociology or criminology in a learning environment that is very much focused on discussion and debate of these issues. In this regard the dissertation represents the cap stone of the undergraduate degree providing an opportunity for the student to demonstrate their skills as an autonomous learner and researcher, albeit with routine expert supervision discussed above.

    In addition to one-to-one supervision which students receive as part of their dissertation, throughout the programme students are assigned to an academic advisor who will normally meet with students 2-3 times per year to discuss progress and advise on programme choices. All staff maintain a regular office hour where students are welcome to meet on a drop-in basis but staff are available at other times by appointment to support and advise students.

    In addition, the School is linked to the work of four Research Centres who regularly run seminars on relevant research interests to which current students are invited.

    Content

    The course overall progressively develops your critical understanding of criminology through the examination of key concepts and theory. This is enhanced further through development of core methodological skills so that students advance key analytical skills and expertise. In essence in taking the course you will be able to confidently analyse complex criminological questions and present them in a highly academic and scholarly fashion.

    Year 1

    Modules provide you with a core grounding in criminological theory and concepts, social research methods, as well as specific topics on crime, deviance and criminal justice. Please note all modules are subject to change.

    Compulsory modules:

    In previous years modules have included:

    • Understanding Crime
    • Criminal Justice Landscape^^*
    • Introduction to Research
    • Conceptualising Society.

    Candidates shall also study and be assessed in modules to the value of 20 credits from Level 1 open modules offered by The Board of Studies of the School of Applied Social Sciences or another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the Centre for Foreign Language Study).

    Year 2

    You will build on and extend your criminological knowledge further developing core skills in research. Modules now become more specialised and the questions surrounding criminological enquiry become more focused and intense. The theoretical detail of criminological enquiry is expanded in both the core theory and methods modules.

    You will study:

    • Contemporary Criminological Theory
    • Social Research Methods.

    Depending on module choice, you may also study topics such as:

    • Sociology of Social Exclusion
    • Crime, Power and Social Inequalities
    • Sport, Crime and Deviance
    • Media, Sport and Society
    • Sports Development: Policies and Practices
    • Self, Identity and Society
    • Modules to the value of 20 credits from open modules offered by another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the Centre for Foreign Language Study).

    Year 3

    You will concentrate on more complex criminological issues and themes and will also take a double module Dissertation, which provides an opportunity to explore a criminological topic in greater depth.

    Depending on module choice, specific study can include:

    • Issues in Criminal Justice
    • Cybercrime: Crime in the Information Age
    • Sociology of Punishment
    • Sociology of Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation 
    • Drugs, Crime and Society
    • Sociology of Gender and Sexuality
    • Rural Studies and Social Policy
    • Social Policy
    • Sociology of Work and Professions
    • Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry
    • Sociology of Health and Medicine
    • Sports Policy in Action
    • Modules to the value of 20 credits offered within the School or from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the Centre for Foreign Language Study).

    Study Abroad

    We are part of the SOCRATES/ERASMUS programme which encourages students to study for part of their course in a university of another EU country.

    We currently have links with the universities of Helsinki in Finland and Duisburg-Essen in Germany. Students can also apply to the university-wide international exchange programme with universities in North America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.


    UK requirements for international applications

    Universities in the United Kingdom use a centralized system of undergraduate application: University and College Admissions Service (UCAS). It is used by both domestic and international students. Students have to register on the UCAS website before applying to the university. They will find all the necessary information about the application process on this website. Some graduate courses also require registration on this website, but in most cases students have to apply directly to the university. Some universities also accept undergraduate application through Common App (the information about it could be found on universities' websites).

    Both undergraduate and graduate students may receive three types of responses from the university. The first one, “unconditional offer” means that you already reached all requirements and may be admitted to the university. The second one, “conditional offer” makes your admission possible if you fulfill some criteria – for example, have good grades on final exams. The third one, “unsuccessful application” means that you, unfortunately, could not be admitted to the university of you choice.

    All universities require personal statement, which should include the reasons to study in the UK and the information about personal and professional goals of the student and a transcript, which includes grades received in high school or in the previous university.


    program_requirements

    Subject requirements, level and grade

    In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

    • Our normal GCE A-level requirement is AAB
    • We do not include General Studies or Critical Thinking as part of our offer
    • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements, such as BTECs (normally DDD), International Baccalaureate (on its own or combined with other qualifications – Required Grades: 36 points) and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study. Please contact our Admissions Selectors
    • One essay-based subject at A-level, or equivalent, is desirable
    • We do not include General Studies or Critical Thinking as part of our offer
    • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Centre offers multidisciplinary programmes degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree programmes courses.
    • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

    We endeavour to make offers as quickly as possible, however, we are committed to the principle of equal consideration, which means that any application made to us through UCAS by the deadline of the 15th January has a chance of being considered for an offer. Because of this we cannot make all our decisions straight away when they reach us, so we may not inform some applicants who applied as early as September of our decision until March. However, we do this because each application really matters to us and we want to make offers to those applicants who show the strongest merit and potential in their application.

    Preferred Tests:

    a. IELTS: 6.5 (no component under 6.0)

    b. TOEFL iBT (internet based test): 92 (no component under 23)

    c. Cambridge Proficiency (CPE): Grade C

    d. Cambridge Advanced (CAE): Grade A

    e. Cambridge IGCSE First Language English at Grade C or above [not normally acceptable for students who require a Tier 4 student visa]

    f. Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language at Grade B or above [not normally acceptable for students who require a Tier 4 student visa]

    g. GCSE English Language at grade C or above

    h. Pearson Test of English (overall score 62 (with no score less than 56 in each component))

    Alternative accepted tests when those listed in a.-h. above are unavailable to the applicant (if the applicant requires a Tier 4 visa to study, advice on the suitability of these alternatives must be sought from the Student Recruitment and Admissions Office):

    i. Certificate of Attainment (Edexcel)

    j. GCE A-levels (AQA, CIE, Edexcel, CCEA, OCR, WJEC) at grade C or above in an essay based, humanities or social science subject from the following list: History, Philosophy, Government and Politics, English Language, English Literature, Geography, Religious Studies, Economics, Business Studies, Law and Sociology. Modern or Classical Languages are not acceptable in meeting this requirement.

    k. International Baccalaureate with a minimum of grade 5 in Standard Level English or a minimum of grade 5 if taken at Higher Level.

    l. NEAB (JMB) Test in English (Overseas)

    m. Singapore Integrated Programme (SIPCAL) at grade C or above in an essay based, humanities or social science subject from the following list: History, Philosophy, Government and Politics, English Language, English Literature, Geography, Religious Studies, Economics, Business Studies, Law and Sociology. Modern or Classical Languages are not acceptable in meeting this requirement.

    n. Singapore Polytechnic Diploma and Advanced Diplomas at GPA 3.0 or above

    o. WAEC and NECO Grade B3 or above from Nigeria and Ghana

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