Suffolk University logo
  • Tuition Fee:
  • Local: n/a
  • Foreign: $ 16.3k / Semester
  • Languages of instruction:
  • English
  • Deadline:
  • 15 Tháng hai 2016

    Description

    The entrepreneurship major consists of a minimum of twenty-one (21) semester hours, which includes five (5) required courses and two (2) elective courses taken at Suffolk University.

    The core entrepreneurship courses occur in a five (5) semester sequence starting in your second semester of your sophomore year (you may begin in your first semester of your sophomore year, but no later than the second semester of your junior year).

    Detailed Course Facts

    Application deadline February 15, 2015 Tuition fee
    • USD 16265 Semester (National)

    Full-time: 12-17 credits per semester $16,265

    Start date 2016 Credits 124 credits

    BSBA students must complete a minimum of 124 credits, AND all mandatory courses and requirements.

    Duration full-time 48 months Languages Take an IELTS test
    • English
    Delivery mode On Campus Educational variant Full-time

    Course Content

    Required Courses, 5 Courses, 15 Credits

    • ENT-280 Opportunity Recognition and Discovery
    • ENT-300 Legal and Financial Risk With Startups
    • ENT-315 Entrepreneurial Skills
    • ENT-326 Writing the Business Plan
    • ENT-419 E-Project Opportunity

    Elective Courses*, 2 Courses, 6 Credits

    • ENT-320 Small Business Management

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      How do you manage the day-to-day challenges or working in a small business or starting a new venture? This case-driven course covers the role and importance of small business in the U.S. economy, including the application of all management functions to the operation of a small business; human resources, operations, financial, risk and growth. This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ENT-350 Social Entrepreneurship

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • ENT-352 Green and Sustainable Business

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ENT-354 Global Entrepreneurship

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ENT-358 Launching New Products

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ENT-360 Launching the E-Business

      Prerequisites:

      Take MKT-210 or MKT-H210 and junior standing required.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This experiential course is an entrepreneurial approach towards developing a real e-commerce business. Students will build off their marketing skills and entrepreneurial ambitions by a) advancing e-commerce ideas to opportunities, b) understanding the product, logistical, marketing, and managerial challenges associated with e-commerce startups, and c) developing financial models to predict and measure performance. This will be accomplished by students developing a launch plan for the opportunity, as well as executing portions of the launch plan.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • ENT-366 Starting and Managing a Restaurant

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Do you want to start or manage a restaurant? The restaurant industry is highly competitive with high turnover. The challenges are tough enough when you understand the business, however, too many entrepreneurs who start or many restaurants lack the necessary experience. This course will help you understand the crucial elements of launching or managing a restaurant, including: business organization, funding, location, market analysis, lease v. buy, facility layout, professional resources, licensing, human resources, technology, purchasing, advertising, insurance, record-keeping, and expansion.

    • ENT-436 Managing the Family Business

      Prerequisites:

      MGT-217(MGT 317), Junior standing,

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ENT-510 Entrepreneurship Ind. Study

      Prerequisites:

      ENT 326 and Senior Standing. Note: This course may be used as an ENT major elective.

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Are you looking for an ENT major elective to help you continue with research associated with your opportunity of venture? This independent study is available to students who are looking to expand on their classroom experience by doing additional research related to their prospective opportunity or venture. Students must draft the statement of work related to the independent study, with a primary focus on solving a problem or problems through extensive research, as well as have an ENT faculty member supervise the student during the study. The statement of work must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the statement of work is completed, the student must attach the statement of work to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

      Term:

      Occasional

    • MGT-313 Human Resource Management

      Prerequisites:

      ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); Junior standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course includes a study of the modern human resources department in industry with special emphasis on the techniques and methods of management, utilization of people, and contemporary human resource issues and problems.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • MGT-322 Managing Diversity in the Workplace

      Prerequisites:

      MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317) or Instructor's consent required; Junior standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course explores multicultural diversity in business organizations. In order to learn to effectively manage diversity in the workplace, it is first necessary to become familiar with the concepts and dynamics that underlie many of the organizational issues associated with increased diversity in the workplace. Thus, this course is structured to first study topics such as identity, perception, socialization, stereotyping, and prejudice. With these concepts as a foundation, we will explore the opportunities and challenges created by diversity in the workplace. We will consider issues and dynamics that arise in the workplace as a result of diversity in terms of gender, race, national origin, sexual orientation, and religion. After developing a rich understanding of workplace diversity dynamics, we will consider actions that individuals and organizations can take to address the opportunities and challenges inherent in a diverse workforce to gain competitive advantage. .

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • MGT-335 Managing Across Cultures

      Prerequisites:

      MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      To what extent are our identities. ways of thinking, and behaving the products of our cultural environments? How do conceptions of motivation, leadership, decision making, negotiation, and ethics differ across cultures? How do expatriates settle abroad, and how do they re-enter the American life they are once so familiar? The purpose of this course is to examine the international context of management, specifically, the cross-cultural environment and how it shapes managers' and work organization members' experiences, roles and responsibilities.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • MGT-401 Negotiations

      Prerequisites:

      MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • MKT-313 Professional Selling

      Prerequisites:

      MKT 210

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Students in professional selling learn many of the skills needed to prosper in a sales position. Particularly, the stages of the professional selling process are examined, as well as the role of sales in today's marketing environment. Emphasis is placed on adaptive selling techniques and developing effective interpersonal communication skills. A detailed examination of sales careers is provided.

    • MKT-315 Integrated Marketing Communication

      Prerequisites:

      MKT 210

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) is a cross-functional process for managing customer relationships that drive brand value. This course examines the strategic foundations of IMC, the factors and processes necessary for creating, sending, and receiving successful brand messages. Furthermore, the social, ethical and legal issues as well as measurement and evaluation of marketing communication will be examined.

    • MKT-317 Consumer Behavior

      Prerequisites:

      MKT 210

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      In this course we focus on people as consumers of products, services, and experiences. We do so by drawing upon theories of consumption in fields as diverse as psychology, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Students engage in projects that link theory to insights on consumer buying, using, and disposing behavior and the application of these insights in marketing programs. In the process they become more critical consumers. The classes are discussion based and active participation from students is expected.

    • MKT-319 Marketing Research

      Prerequisites:

      MKT 210; STATS 250 (or STATS 240 AND either MKT 318 or MKT 320)

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      In this course, students explore the process and practice of research in a marketing context. The impact of research as it affects and shapes managerial decision making for organizations is a central focus. Specifically, we examine the process of designing and conducting qualitative and quantitative marketing research studies. We cover specific method-related practices that facilitate unbiased data collection, data analysis (via SPSS), interpretation of marketing research results, and presentation of such results for use by marketing managers.

    • MKT-420 Marketing for Entrepreneurs

      Prerequisites:

      MKT 210

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course covers the critical role of marketing for entrepreneurs and start-up companies as they attempt to define and carve out a market for a new company, product or service. We will examine through both class discussion and case study how marketing must infiltrate the entire organization beginning with the concept, the business plan and through the early stage development phase. Moreover, we will discuss the creation of the new venture marketing plan, the budgeting and human resource allocation process and its integration into the business plan. We will also look at tactics from guerrilla marketing through mass media executions, the potential ROI for both and their influence on the ultimate success of the enterprise.

    • MKT-477 eMarketing

      Prerequisites:

      MKT 210

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course explores how we can use the principles of web marketing as effective marketing tools. The course will have the following learning components: lectures, guest lectures, web site analyses, and student project presentations.

    • SIB-419 Global Business Theory & Practice

      Prerequisites:

      MKT 210; ISOM 319; MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); SIB 321

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course will integrate global business theories and concepts with practice. Topics include: Transnational strategy, foreign direct investment, regional development clusters, role and operation of the WTO, outsourcing and supply chain management, and international ethics. Students integrate discipline-specific knowledge, practice investigation and decision-making around global business issues, improve business communication skills, and practice teamwork for global business decision- making.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • SIB-550 Special Topics in Strategy and International Business

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in international business. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

      Type:

      Diverse Perspectives

    • ACCT-320 Federal Taxation I

      Prerequisites:

      ACCT 202

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This first course in taxation concentrates on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. The objective of the course is to explore the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions and credits and an introduction to property transactions. A major emphasis is placed on how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

    • BLE-318 Intro to Real Estate Principles

      Prerequisites:

      BLE 214

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course is designed to introduce beginning students to the concepts and principles of real estate. The class will allow students to understand the key components of each major real estate asset class (including residential, retail, commercial, industrial, hospitality, properties etc.). Students will also understand the full range of professional players in the industry and what roles they play (brokers, contractors, developers, appraisers, lenders, lawyers, architect, etc.). We will teach the basic elements of a Development Pro-forma Budget, an Operating Pro-forma Budget, and a Sources and Uses Statement? as we learn about some of the essential financial schedules. We begin our discussion with a case that will teach you how to get started and to explore the considerations and tradeoffs in evaluating a specific real estate transaction. The course format utilizes the text, case work, selected web based data sources, selected readings and field trips. Throughout the course, an emphasis is placed on the practical application of the concepts taught, the use of current examples from the industry and today's marketplace.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    • FIN-315 Principles of Investments

      Prerequisites:

      FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • FIN-317 Real Estate

      Prerequisites:

      FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310)

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ISOM-212 Web Design

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      Web Design introduces the concepts, vocabulary, and procedures associated with web design. Students will learn how to conceptualize and design professional websites using Wix.com and Microsoft's Expression Web software. Topics will include website evaluation, information architecture, customer and task analysis, usability testing, web-hosting options, typography, color composition, screen layout, navigation, and cascading style sheets. Students will learn practical skills and techniques in projects involving digital photography, image editing, multimedia, and animation. ISOM 212 will also cover important web design themes such as accessibility, globalization, personalization, and trust.

      Term:

      Offered Both Fall and Spring

    • ISOM-244 Web Application Development

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This first course in Internet application development equips students with the principles, methodology and skills required to define, develop and deploy a fully functional dynamic web application. Students will learn how to customize the content, appearance, and delivery of their website using industry-standard web development tools. Class discussion will focus on web development issues for organizations as well as the role played by development tools such as HTML5, CSS3, XML, and scripting. Each class will include hands-on lab work. A term project will be used to wrap the course content together.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ISOM-315 Mobile App Development

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course provides a comprehensive introduction to mobile app technology and design concepts. Students learn how to design, build, and optimize cross-platform mobile app using HTML5 standards. Students use CSS3, JavaScript and several JavaScript frameworks and techniques such as jQuery, jQuery Mobile, and AJAX. In addition, students will use Web services, such as Google Maps, and Web Application Programming Interfaces (Web APIs) to integrate content into their apps. Students will learn how to convert HTML5 apps into native apps for various mobile platforms. This is an introductory course and assumes no prior programming experience.

      Term:

      Offered Spring Term

    • ISOM-331 Global Electronic Commerce

      Prerequisites:

      ISOM-210

      Credits:

      3.00

      Description:

      This course examines the role of information systems and e-commerce in global business competition. It considers the technological, cultural, economic, social and legal issues in the development of cross-border information systems for business or social developments. Readings and cases will be used to examine current issues, as well as opportunities and challenges. Prerequisites: ISOM 310, or ISOM 423 or ACCT 430 May also be taken concurrently.

      Term:

      Offered Fall Term

    *All ENT courses listed above require junior standing.

    BSBA Degree Requirements

    The completion of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree includes:

    • A minimum of 124 semester hours of coursework and satisfaction of all degree requirements;

    • 2.0 overall cumulative average;
    • 2.0 average in major and minor fields of study;
    • A minimum of 30 semester hours of business coursework must be completed at Suffolk University; and,
    • An overall minimum of 45 semester hours of coursework must be completed at Suffolk University to be eligible to be considered for degree.

    BSBA students must complete a minimum of 124 credits, AND all mandatory courses and requirements. Course descriptions may be updated periodically to reflect changes since the last published catalog.
    Full-time students normally complete their degree requirements in four years. A student may shorten the time required by attending summer sessions. Part-time students normally take five to seven years to complete the requirements, depending on the course load carried

    Students are responsible for knowing and complying with specific degree requirements. Any exception to the Program of Study requires written approval from Michele Rosenthal, Director, Undergraduate Programs, Sawyer Business School.

    Recommended Four-Year Course Sequence

    Below is an overview of the courses students must complete and the year they are expected to do so. Students should meet with their advisors to review their program of study.
    The Business School’s curriculum is designed to enable students to acquire knowledge and skills cumulatively, building from introductory material to more specialized or advanced study in areas of major concentration. Prerequisites have been established for courses that require preparation in order for students to benefit fully from the learning experience.
    Students are responsible for taking courses in the prescribed sequence. This means:

    • All prerequisites must be satisfied
    • Students must have satisfactorily completed 54 credits in order to register for upper division courses in the Business School (Business School undergraduate courses numbered 300 or higher, unless otherwise stated).
    • Students must have completed all freshman and sophomore required courses prior to registering in junior-level courses. In particular, students are expected to have completed required writing and quantitative courses before the junior year.

    Required Courses to be completed in the first year

    • SBS-100 careerSTART
    • WRI-101 First Year Writing I
    • WRI-102 First Year Writing II
    • ENT-101 Business Foundations
    • STATS-250 Applied Statistics
    • BLE-215 Business Ethics and Law
    • HST-149 Empires & Globalization in World History I
    • HST-150 Empires & Globalization in World History II
    • MATH-128 Math for the Modern World
    • MATH-130 Topics in Finite Mathematics
    • MATH-134 Calculus for Management & Social Sciences
    • MATH-165 Calculus I

    Required courses to be completed by the end of the sophomore year

    • SBS-200 careerEXPLORE
    • EC-102 Global Macroeconomics
    • ACCT-201 Acct for Decision Making I
    • ACCT-202 Acct for Decision Making II
    • ISOM-201 Data and Decisions Analysis
    • MGT-217 Organizational Behavior
    • MKT-210 Principles of Marketing
    • MKT-220 Business Research Methods
    • SBS-300 careerBUILD
    • EC-101 Applied Microeconomics
    • BLE-214 Principles of Business Law
    • FIN-200 Business Finance
    • ISOM-310 Management Information Systems
    • ISOM-319 Operations Management
    Local Engagement Experience

    Required courses to be completed during or by the end of senior year

    • SIB-429 Strategic Management
    • SBS-400 careerLAUNCH

    When searching for classes, select course type "STE". Choose from the options provided.

    Review the list of options with your advisor.

    Free Electives

    BSBA students must complete a total of 124 credits to graduate. In addition to completing all degree program and major requirements, students have free elective credits that they may use to complete a minor, explore topics of interest by taking courses in the College of Arts & Sciences or the Business School, take honors challenge courses, or use toward a second major. Many transfer students bring in credits that are applied as free electives when there is no program equivalent. The number of free elective credits to be completed varies by major, number of transfer credits, and other factors. Students should refer to their program evaluation for credit counts, and discuss free elective options with their advisors.

    USA requirements for international students

    Each university in the Unites States of America sets its own admission standards so there isn't the same criteria for all the students and the university can decide which applicants meet those standards. The fee for each application is between $35 to $100. 

    After the selections of the universities you want to attend, the best of all would be to contact each university for an application form and more admission information for the international students. Moreover, for a graduate or postgraduate program it's necessary to verify the admission requirements. Some programs require that you send your application directly to their department. 

    Admissions decisions are based on students's academic record and different test scores, such as TOEFL, the SAT or ACT (for undergraduate programs) and GRE or GMAT (for graduate programs). Admission decision is based on your academic results and motivation.


    program_requirements

    English Language Requirements

    TOEFL paper-based test score : 550 TOEFL iBT® test : 77

    To study at this university, you have to speak English. We advice you to

    take an IELTS test. More About IELTS

    Requirements

    We do not use specific minimums for scores or grades in the decision process, but weigh all factors together to gain a whole view of you and your potential for success as a Suffolk University student:

    • Level and range of high school courses selected
    • Grades achieved (official high school transcript with senior year grades)
    • SAT or ACT scores (our code is 3771)
    • Recommendations (two required; one from a guidance counselor, one from a teacher)
    • The essay
    • Other required forms
    • Admission interview (optional)
    • Transfer students should view the transfer requirements page for more details.

    Work Experience

    No work experience is required.

    Related Scholarships*

    • Academic Excellence Scholarship

      "The Academic Excellence Scholarship can provide up to a 50 % reduction in tuition per semester. These scholarships will be renewed if the student maintains superior academic performance during each semester of their 3-year Bachelor programme. The scholarship will be directly applied to the student’s tuition fees."

    • Alumni Study Travel Fund

      Scholarships for students who are already attending the University of Reading.

    • Amsterdam Merit Scholarships

      The University of Amsterdam aims to attract the world’s brightest students to its international classrooms. Outstanding students from outside the European Economic Area can apply for an Amsterdam Merit Scholarship.

    * The scholarships shown on this page are suggestions first and foremost. They could be offered by other organisations than Suffolk University.

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